Recent Articles

Knowledge to Action: Wheelchair Cushions

25/01/2016

Hello all! When I lead in-person education sessions on wheelchair cushions, one of the questions that I am frequently asked is, “How do you get staff to put the cushions on the correct way?” When the cushion is removed from the wheelchair to clean the cover and/or the cushion base, mistakes some...

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The Steps to Wheelchair Provision

16/12/2015

Let’s finish the trilogy on assessments by looking at the overall process of wheelchair provision, of which assessment is only one step, by taking a broader look at all the steps that go into providing an appropriate wheelchair for an individual

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The Science of Manual Tilt Mechanisms

28/08/2015

Have you ever sat in a chair and tried balancing yourself by tilting backwards onto the back two legs of the chair? Perhaps you held onto the table in front of you and used your arms to push yourself backwards to find the balance point? You may remember doing this when you were a child in either grade school or high school. Some o fyou may have experienced going past the tipping point and having the chair fall behind you, or if you were lucky enough, you quickly recovered bu moving your weight forward to prevent falling backwards. (I am not recommending anyone try this while sitting in a chair - it can be dangerous and you can fall backwards and get hurt! I just realize that it is something I have done in my youth and I have seen my own children do it too – and, of course, I cautioned them against it.)

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WC19: Wheelchairs Used as Seats in Motor Vehicles

25/11/2014

This month, let’s think about safety, wheelchairs, and transit.  Individuals who remain seated in wheelchairs while travelling in vehicles are “45 times more likely to be injured in a crash than the typical passenger”1 (p. 2).  The “typical” passenger in a vehicle transfers into the vehicle manufacturer’s seat, which is secured to the vehicle, and uses the occupant restraint system; that is, the seat belt system that also is secured to the vehicle.  Individuals who must remain seated in wheelchairs while travelling in vehicles also are at risk of injury in “non-collision events”, such as sudden braking or sharp turning, resulting in the wheelchair tipping, securement failure, or the occupant falling out of the wheelchair1 (p. 4).  Many individuals who must remain seated in the wheelchair during transit do not have postural control or the ability to stabilize themselves or their wheelchairs during these non-collision events, which can result in serious injuries.

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Handout Webinar Taking the Fear out of Programming Power WCs 2017

Handout - Power Mobility Webinar Feb 2017

Handout - Transit Standards for Seating WCs and WC Tiedowns

Bariatric Measurement Chart

Measurement Chart

Seating Assessment Form

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