Education in Motion / Clinical Corner Archive

Clinical Corner Archive

Wheelchair Basketball

Wheelchair Basketball

Last summer, Clinical Corner looked at two different sports for individuals who are wheelchair users – handcycling and wheelchair tennis. See Wheelchair Tennis and Handcycling for the full articles. This month, let’s continue our look at parasport with a focus on wheelchair basketball.

2017-06-28

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Heat and Moisture Dissipation in Seating

Heat and Moisture Dissipation in Seating

With the summer months approaching, it is a good opportunity for us to re-visit wheelchair seating and to consider how seating can affect heat and moisture dissipation for individuals who use wheelchairs. While there are many factors that affect one’s risk for skin breakdown, moisture can contribute to the risk of skin breakdown for some individuals. Choice of materials, design and covers will influence the potential for heat and moisture build-up and/or dissipation in wheelchair cushions. The same can be said for back supports as well.

2017-05-30

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Enhancing Rigidity in Folding Wheelchairs

Enhancing Rigidity in Folding Wheelchairs

The Clinical Corner article, Manual Mobility: The Basics, describes the different categories of manual wheelchairs, known generically as transport, standard, custom folding, custom rigid and tilt-in-space. It was noted that the more rigid the wheelchair, the easier it is to propel the chair as rigidity decreases flex in the frame of the chair. The ideal is that all of the energy of propulsion is translated into movement as any frame flex is lost movement. The more rigid the wheelchair, the more efficient the propulsion can be.

2017-04-25

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Taking a Second Look

Taking a Second Look

In September of 2015, I wrote an article for Clinical Corner, entitled “Best Practices in Seating and Mobility Assessments”. As outlined in that article, the following concepts were found to be necessary for best practices in seating and mobility assessments: experience; hands-on techniques; skills; technology; resources; self-directed learning; follow-up; and consumer relationships.1 The article expanded on each of the concepts. Click here for a link to the article. This month, let’s take a second look at some of the best practices in seating and mobility assessments, specifically technology and resources. Let’s also consider why we should take a second look at products and technology.

2017-03-21

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Putting Evidence into Practice for Power Positioning

Putting Evidence into Practice for Power Positioning

Last month’s Clinical Corner article addressed The Evidence on Tilt, Recline and Elevating Leg Supports. The article reviewed the clinical benefits of tilt, recline and elevating leg supports and summarized the research findings with respect to angles required for redistributing and relieving pressure through tilt and/or recline. This month, let’s look at the practical application of power positioning. For what reasons do individuals use their power positioning features? How often are individuals completing pressure relieving movements through power positioning? How can technology assist individuals with pressure management?

2017-02-28

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